FINANCIAL PLANNING

"Financial planning” is the process of laying the foundation for your financial house and creating a vision of your future. Think of us as the architect for your financial future. When you engage in “investment management,” you build on that financial plan by choosing the specific investments with which you’ll construct your portfolio.

The Putney Process

New clients are scheduled for an initial two-hour meeting. We analyze your situation and listen to your plans with great sensitivity. We discuss philosophy, lifestyle, income, investments and your goals for your family. Often we help you define – and resolve – complex, multidimensional, multi-generational issues. Putney helps you set realistic goals and manageable action steps to provide a clear path to success.

Our planning process includes an in-depth analysis of your current financial circumstances. We evaluate strengths and weaknesses. We uncover opportunities. We systematically educate you about your options. Then we establish a customized plan that addresses
•    Retirement
•    Investments
•    Asset protection and insurance
•    Taxes
•    Stock options
•    Estate issues
•    Children’s education
•    Charitable giving
•    Business succession

The resulting plan is comprehensive, integrated, dynamic and completely responsive to your individual circumstances. It is based on your objectives, time horizons, risk tolerance and liquidity needs. It is the road map - it is a financial expression of your personal vision

Above is a German Bond from the 1920s.  Germany during the 20s saw one of the world’s worst inflationary periods.  Following World War I, the German economy totally collapsed and prices rose so rapidly that literally bushel baskets of currency were used in everyday transactions.  This 1,000,000 Mark bond sold in New York for less than $400 (US).  Just eight years before, a million Marks had a value of more than $300,000 (US).


Above is a German Bond from the 1920s.  Germany during the 20s saw one of the world’s worst inflationary periods.  Following World War I, the German economy totally collapsed and prices rose so rapidly that literally bushel baskets of currency were used in everyday transactions.  This 1,000,000 Mark bond sold in New York for less than $400 (US).  Just eight years before, a million Marks had a value of more than $300,000 (US).